Gardens Mall event raises about $15,000 for Loggerhead Center

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(Left to right) Michael Brown, winner of this year’s Juno Beach Pier Photo Contest, Loggerhead mascot Fletch and Loggerhead President and CEO Jack Lighton at Aug. 19 event (Photos contributed)

More than $15,000 was raised Aug. 19 for the Loggerhead Marinelife Center at the The Gardens Mall event attended by about 4,000 people.

Events for children and families included hands-on science activities, including Junior Vet Labs and conservation demonstrations.

The Gardens Mall and its retailers hosted various Shop and Support events to raise money for LMC, located in Juno Beach.

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Adrian Farmer and stuffed sea turtle at The Garden Mall fundraiser

 

Jupiter struts its stuff to attract a new town manager

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“Pristine beaches, unmatched recreational offerings, stunning scenic vistas, a high quality of life,” reads the national advertisement seeking a new town manager in Jupiter.

About 50 candidates from across the country sent in their resumes, seeking the position that Andy Lukasik vacated.

Read the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

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Wrists bands – and more stuff you didn’t know – about Juno Beach Pier

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The Juno Beach Pier is a great spot to fish, watch rocket launches, take photos, enjoy sunsets/sunrises, attend church services, get married, watch sea turtles and bring a brown-bag lunch. (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

Fishermen and sightseers to the Juno Beach Fishing Pier might be wondering:

What’s up with the wrist bands?

And the music?

It’s all part of making the pier experience more fun, says Jack Lighton, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Loggerhead Marinelife Center, which manages the Juno Beach Fishing Pier just south of Marcinski Road.

The recorded music is piped-in. Live music events on the pier have been held.

As for the wrist bands now handed out to pier visitors:

“Guests often leave the pier to use the restrooms or leave during a quick passing rain shower.  The guest entry bands allow for quick re-entry to the pier and eliminates the need for our guests to hold and manage paper receipts,” according to Lighton.

The wrist bands allow pier visitors to leave and return on the same day without paying

Here’s numbers on sea life rescues:

  • 42 sea turtles rescued from the pier (2013 – present)
  • 52 shore birds rescued from the pier (2015 – present) 

Read about LMC’s  $14 million expansion.

More Juno Beach Pier numbers:

  • 2016 Anglers: 36,206
  • 2016 Visitors: 73,269
  • 2016 Amount of fishing line recycled (in miles): 52.68 miles
  • 2016 Amount of glass and aluminum recycled: 19,465 individual items
  • 2016 Amount of cigarette butts collected and disposed of: 3,924
  • 2016 Amount of underwater debris removed via underwater pier cleanups: 199.06 lbs.
  • 2007 – present: amount of underwater debris removed via underwater pier cleanups: 2,637.91 lbs.

Jonathan Zmistowski, left, and Byron Thomas show the 60-pound wahoo they caught on the morning of June 28 while trolling a lure in 88 feet off the Juno Beach Pier.(File photo)

 

Daily, it’s $1 to walk on the pier. For fishermen, it’s $4.

The hours of operation of the Juno Beach Fishing Pier:

March 1st – October 31st: Monday – Sunday 30 minutes before sunrise – sunset

November 1st – February 28th: Sunday-Thursday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m. and Friday – Saturday 6 a.m. to midnight.

LMC, using grants and support the Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County and Keep America Beautiful:
– Added tables and seating to the pier deck
– Hosted several FREE fishing clinics
– Added additional recycling containers
– Added additional monofilament (fishing line) recycling containers
– Added cigarette butt recycling containers

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Cigarette butts make up a large portion of the trash collected on the north county beach. 

 

No more balloons at PBC parks starting Sept. 1 to protect sealife

Sea turtles often wind up mistaking plastic for food and choking on them.

Starting Sept. 1, balloons are illegal at Palm Beach County beachfront parks.

READ: Balloon releases banned in Palm Beach

“Sea turtles think they are jellyfish. Plastic in the ocean is a big issue. We want to protect native wild life and preserve the environment,” said Jennifer Cirillo, Palm Beach County assistant director of parks and recreation.

Signs have been posted at Loggerhead Park on A1A for about a year in preparation for the county ordinance to go in effect Sept. 1., said Cirillo.

“The public has had a positive response,” she said.

Loggerhead Marinelife Center officials welcome the balloon ban.

Medical staff at LMC often treat turtles injured from eating balloons and other plastic items.

When ingested, the remains can potentially damage sea turtles’ digestive systems, lead to starvation and even death.

“Ending the use of balloons at these beachfront parks will help protect sea turtles and other coastal wildlife, as well as provide clean, beautiful parks for locals and thousands of out-of-county guests who visit them every year,” said Tommy Cutt, LMC’s chief conservation officer.

The penalty is up to $500 and up to 60 days in jail faces a person who violates the balloon ban, according to county records.

Signs recently have been posted in 11 beachfront Palm Beach County parks between Boca Raton and Tequesta.

Leading up to Sept. 1, park officials will warn those visiting the parks who have balloons about the upcoming ordinance.

Sea turtles, dolphins, whales, fish and birds have been reported with balloons in their stomachs and ribbons and strings can lead to entanglement, injuries and even death, according to Florida Fish and Wildlife Service.

There are two types of balloons in general use – latex and mylar.

Mylar balloons are made with nylon. They are not considered biodegradable.

Although latex balloons are considered bio-degradable, this will take anywhere from 6 months to 4 years to decompose. Latex balloons can be especially deadly as their burst remnants actually mimic the food of many creatures, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

READ: Banning plastic shopping bags is gaining support

Coral Gables on May 9 was the first in Florida to approve a plastic bag ban. City commissioners approved the prohibiting the use of single-use, carryout plastic bags by retailers in the city and at special events.

Violators in Coral Gables face a $50 to $500 fine.

Several exceptions are allowed, such as plastic bags that hold prescriptions, those used at veterinarians’ offices, those for yard waste and several more.

These are the Palm Beach County beachfront parks where the balloon ban will be enforced starting Sept. 1:

 

Turtle lovers and shoppers meet at The Gardens Mall

Hundreds of sea turtle lovers and shoppers gathered Saturday at The Gardens Mall to learn about and contribute to the Loggerhead Marinelife Center to help sea turtles.

The free event was from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Grand Court of the mall.

Some merchants donated a portion of their sales on Saturday to LMC.

Marian is a sea turtle patient at Loggerhead Marinelife Center

 

 

Love Street plan up for review tonight in Jupiter

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Two-acre Love Street property outlined in red

The Love Street development plan — this one without the boat slips for commercial fishing boats — is up for review today at 7 p.m. by the town’s planning and zoning board at the  Jupiter Community Center.

Click here to see the plan.

The town council, which must approve the final plan, is not bound by the planning board’s recommendation.

Opponents blast the Love Street plan, calling it “just another shopping center.”

“There’s not enough parking.” “The jobs it will create are low-paying.” “Pollution of the Jupiter Inlet will result,” they said. About 2,000 local residents signed an online petition opposing the development.

Developer Charles Modica has said the plan to be reviewed tonight, about a quarter the size of the original proposal, preserves the waterfront theme of the Inlet Village, the area along A1A from Beach Road north to U.S. 1.

The meeting is open to the public.

Current Love Street plan:

Property: 2 acres

Retail: 4,949 square feet

Office: 1,941

Outdoor Seating area: 1,781

Restaurant: 11,162

Total: 18,552  square feet

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Research paper published by Loggerhead sea turtle experts:Read it here

Dusty, a sub-adult loggerhead sea turtle, was released by Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach on July 18. Dusty was found floating offshore in St. Lucie County in February. Initial bloodwork showed anemia, hypoglycemia, and overall poor health due to starvation. Hospital staff administered fluids, parenteral nutrition and antibiotics, and placed the turtle in freshwater to remove barnacles and leeches that covered most of the body. Dusty was named after Dusty Baker, manager of the Washington Nationals, which holds spring training at the Ballpark of the Palm Beaches. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

Researchers biologists from the Research Laboratory at Loggerhead Marinelife Center recently published a scientific study  — and you can read it online.

The peer-reviewed paper is published in the Science of the Total Environment journal and can be accessed over the next 50 days for free.

For more information visit authors.elsevier.com.

For more information on LMC’s research projects, visit marinelife.org/research.

The paper discusses how contaminants such as mercury and natural toxins from red tide algal blooms affect sea turtles’ health.

LMC’s research biologists and colleagues from other laboratories collected blood samples and examined otherwise healthy turtles to see if they showed signs of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a tumor disease that affects green sea turtles.

Then, they examined health parameters in plasma, and found that brevetoxins from red tide potentially contributed to inflammation, increased tumor growth and decreased body condition in Kemp’s ridleys and greens.

“These contaminants can potentially impact disease development and negatively impact the immune function and survival of these endangered marine turtles,” said LMC’s Dr. Justin Perrault. “We hope to continue learning about how these toxins affect sea turtles in an effort to better understand treatment options for animals that strand as a result of red tide.”

This is the first study to reveal that brevetoxin exposure may promote FP tumor growth in green sea turtles, according to LMC.

For more information about LMC, visit www.marinelife.org or call (561) 627-8280.

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This sea turtle was recently healed and released at LMC

 

 

Sea turtle release on Wednesday in Juno Beach

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Big crowds usually attend sea turtle release (Photo/Rich Graulich)

Krebster and Dr. Paul, two loggerhead sea turtles nursed back to health at Loggerhead Marinelife Centert are scheduled to be released back into the Atlantic Ocean in Juno Beach on Wednesday at about 10:30 a.m.

See the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

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Now healthy, two sea turtles swim home Wednesday from Juno Beach

 

Krebster and Dr. Paul, two loggerhead sea turtles nursed back to health at Loggerhead Marinelife Center, are scheduled to be released back into the Atlantic Ocean in Juno Beach on Wednesday at about 10:30 a.m.

The release on the beach at LMC, just north of Donald Ross Road on the east side of U.S. 1, is free and open to the public.

For information, go to marinelife.org.

Krebster was found April 13 near Hutchinson Island with anemia, hypoglycemia and overall poor health due to starvation.

The sea turtle weighed 61 pounds when brought to LMC. The sea turtle now weighs 72 pounds.

Dr. Paul was accidentally hooked by an angler at the Juno Beach Pier on April 17.

The turtle weighed 101 pounds when brought to LMC. Dr. Paul now weighs 105 pounds.

After months of fluids, medications and close monitoring by LMC staff, both have fully recovered.

Sea turtle releases usually draw big crowds. Viewers should get there early. (Photo/Rich Graulich)

 

Can you shoot the best photo of the Juno Beach Pier?

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Sunrise at the Juno Beach Pier (Photo/Rich Graulich)

Loggerhead Marinelife Center is calling photographers of all ages and experiences to submit their best photo of the Juno Beach Pier for the Center’s 3rd annual Juno Beach Pier Photo Contest.

Submissions are open open Monday, July 3 – Aug. 11.

The 990-foot-long pier may not be the longest or showiest, but locals love their pier. See story in the Palm Beach Post.

LMC will showcase and announce the grand prize winner and additional winners at Marinelife Day at The Gardens Mall on Aug. 19.

The grand prize winner’s photo will be featured as the official Juno Beach Pier Facebook profile picture and will win a $200-value LMC gift basket, including a personalized sea turtle adoption.

The annual Easter sunrise service at Juno Beach Pier draws hundreds. See the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

Select photos will also appear on the official Juno Beach Pier Instagram.

Last year, contestants from across Palm Beach County participated, with over 65 photo submissions and over 30,000 views of the Facebook album.

Photos must reveal one’s “pier-spective” of the iconic Juno Beach Pier in some way.

All submissions will be uploaded to Facebook for an independent panel of judges to review and identify the winners.

The most “liked” photo will be named the Facebook fan favorite.

Contestants may submit one high-resolution photo (iPhone photos are accepted) via email to Hannah Deadman, LMC public relations & communications coordinator, at hdeadman@marinelife.org by Aug. 11 to be entered in the contest.

For more information, visit marinelife.org/pier, or call 561-627-8280.

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Juno Beach Pier is managed by Loggerhead Marinelife Center and is 990-feet long. (Photo/Rich Graulich)