Vote on new condos ($900K each) on Jupiter waterfront is delayed

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Profile Art Gallery is located on Indiantown Road across from Harbourside Place in Jupiter (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

A final vote to demolish the three-story Profile Art Gallery across Indiantown Road from Harbourside Place and replace it with a five-story building with 15 condominiums, has been postponed and is scheduled to go before the town council on Sept. 19.

The condos would likely start at about $900,000.

Plans for the one-acre parcel, called Cornerstone, call for the first floor to be about 2,500 square feet of commercial space.

Parking for about 44 vehicles at Cornerstone would be below the building.

A public boat dock with about 14 boat slips is planned for the property on the southwest west corner of Indiantown Road and U.S. 1.

The plan calls for a pool and outdoor kitchen on the roof is being considered on a one-acre site across Indiantown Road from Harbourside.

If approved, the new Mediterranean-style building would be about the same height as Harbourside Place.

The council on first reading approved Cornerstone by a 4-0 vote on July 18. Councilman Ron Delaney was absent.

The final vote was scheduled Tuesday, Aug. 15.

The owners of the property, Jupiter Investments, are asking that the zoning be changed from commercial to mixed use.

The registered agent of Jupiter Investments is Richard Witham.

The plan unanimously was recommended for approval April 13 by the town’s planning and zoning commission.

The town council is not bound by the planning and zoning commission’s recommendation.

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Love Street plan up for review tonight in Jupiter

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Two-acre Love Street property outlined in red

The Love Street development plan — this one without the boat slips for commercial fishing boats — is up for review today at 7 p.m. by the town’s planning and zoning board at the  Jupiter Community Center.

Click here to see the plan.

The town council, which must approve the final plan, is not bound by the planning board’s recommendation.

Opponents blast the Love Street plan, calling it “just another shopping center.”

“There’s not enough parking.” “The jobs it will create are low-paying.” “Pollution of the Jupiter Inlet will result,” they said. About 2,000 local residents signed an online petition opposing the development.

Developer Charles Modica has said the plan to be reviewed tonight, about a quarter the size of the original proposal, preserves the waterfront theme of the Inlet Village, the area along A1A from Beach Road north to U.S. 1.

The meeting is open to the public.

Current Love Street plan:

Property: 2 acres

Retail: 4,949 square feet

Office: 1,941

Outdoor Seating area: 1,781

Restaurant: 11,162

Total: 18,552  square feet

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Research paper published by Loggerhead sea turtle experts:Read it here

Dusty, a sub-adult loggerhead sea turtle, was released by Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach on July 18. Dusty was found floating offshore in St. Lucie County in February. Initial bloodwork showed anemia, hypoglycemia, and overall poor health due to starvation. Hospital staff administered fluids, parenteral nutrition and antibiotics, and placed the turtle in freshwater to remove barnacles and leeches that covered most of the body. Dusty was named after Dusty Baker, manager of the Washington Nationals, which holds spring training at the Ballpark of the Palm Beaches. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

Researchers biologists from the Research Laboratory at Loggerhead Marinelife Center recently published a scientific study  — and you can read it online.

The peer-reviewed paper is published in the Science of the Total Environment journal and can be accessed over the next 50 days for free.

For more information visit authors.elsevier.com.

For more information on LMC’s research projects, visit marinelife.org/research.

The paper discusses how contaminants such as mercury and natural toxins from red tide algal blooms affect sea turtles’ health.

LMC’s research biologists and colleagues from other laboratories collected blood samples and examined otherwise healthy turtles to see if they showed signs of fibropapillomatosis (FP), a tumor disease that affects green sea turtles.

Then, they examined health parameters in plasma, and found that brevetoxins from red tide potentially contributed to inflammation, increased tumor growth and decreased body condition in Kemp’s ridleys and greens.

“These contaminants can potentially impact disease development and negatively impact the immune function and survival of these endangered marine turtles,” said LMC’s Dr. Justin Perrault. “We hope to continue learning about how these toxins affect sea turtles in an effort to better understand treatment options for animals that strand as a result of red tide.”

This is the first study to reveal that brevetoxin exposure may promote FP tumor growth in green sea turtles, according to LMC.

For more information about LMC, visit www.marinelife.org or call (561) 627-8280.

DR PAUL

This sea turtle was recently healed and released at LMC

 

 

Love Street opponents get setback in Jupiter

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A petition brought by a local citizens group to prevent 4 vacant acres of Love Street from becoming an outdoor marketplace was tossed out July 13 by a three-judge panel.

COOLS, the Citizen Owners of Love Street, iled the petition in Palm Beach County Circuit Court to quash the town council’s 2016 vote to approve the plan by developer Charles Modica.

 

Score one for lobsters: Jupiter free divers come up empty

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After about four hours of diving and scouring through jetsam such as a sunken boat, natural debris and even a bathtub in the Intracoastal Waterway, Paul Dabill , leaned against the transom of his 23-foot center console boat and admitted defeat.

“Hey, we knocked on all the doors. The lobsters weren’t home,” said the Tequesta resident, gulping a green Gatorade.

Read the full story — and video — in The Palm Beach Post.

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Sea turtle release on Wednesday in Juno Beach

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Big crowds usually attend sea turtle release (Photo/Rich Graulich)

Krebster and Dr. Paul, two loggerhead sea turtles nursed back to health at Loggerhead Marinelife Centert are scheduled to be released back into the Atlantic Ocean in Juno Beach on Wednesday at about 10:30 a.m.

See the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

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Now healthy, two sea turtles swim home Wednesday from Juno Beach

 

Krebster and Dr. Paul, two loggerhead sea turtles nursed back to health at Loggerhead Marinelife Center, are scheduled to be released back into the Atlantic Ocean in Juno Beach on Wednesday at about 10:30 a.m.

The release on the beach at LMC, just north of Donald Ross Road on the east side of U.S. 1, is free and open to the public.

For information, go to marinelife.org.

Krebster was found April 13 near Hutchinson Island with anemia, hypoglycemia and overall poor health due to starvation.

The sea turtle weighed 61 pounds when brought to LMC. The sea turtle now weighs 72 pounds.

Dr. Paul was accidentally hooked by an angler at the Juno Beach Pier on April 17.

The turtle weighed 101 pounds when brought to LMC. Dr. Paul now weighs 105 pounds.

After months of fluids, medications and close monitoring by LMC staff, both have fully recovered.

Sea turtle releases usually draw big crowds. Viewers should get there early. (Photo/Rich Graulich)

 

North County boaters: What’s your take on the new Waterway Park?

These boaters and others at Waterway Park will soon have safety bumpers on the floating docks at the public boat ramps in Jupiter (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

North county boaters have mostly compliments — and a few complaints — about the new $7 million Waterway Park opened about three months ago in Jupiter.

Palm Beach County’s newest waterfront park — the first since Jim Barry Light Harbor Park was built in Riviera Beach in 2009 — opened in April on the west side of the Intracoastal Waterway at Indiantown Road.

See the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

These public boat ramps at Waterway Park are less steep than other public ramps, and are easier to use, say some boaters (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

 

People surf in Jupiter, why not dogs?

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Sam Chiet with a client (Photo/Bruce Bennett)

When you teach dogs to surf, patience is the key.

“Sometimes they jump off the board. They leap on my head. A few take off down the beach. But they calm down. That’s part of the fun,” said Sam Chiet, a Jupiter Farms resident who charges $30 for 30 minutes to teach canines how to ride the waves at Carlin Park.

Read the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

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All dogs wear life jackets (Photo Taylor Jones)

 

Land clearing starts at Jupiter’s new dog park

Fenced-in areas for little dogs and big dogs are planned (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

Land in being cleared in Jupiter for the $2.5 million dog park at Center Street and Indiantown Road.

Read the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

 

Location of new dog park is outlined in red

Dogs in Jupiter can go to Dog Beach, located north of Marcinski Road