Paddle with the current — BOTH WAYS — with Club Scrub

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Club Scrub’s Endless Summer River Paddle & Rocking Jupiter Sandbar Party is planned for Saturday, Sept. 16.

The Guided Paddle Adventure is  from Jonathan Dickinson State Park down the NW Fork of the Loxahatchee River to the Club Scrub  Jupiter Sandbar Party (about 5-miles).

Paddle down the Loxahatchee River to our Floating Refreshment Stops, relax then paddle the rest of the way to the Rocking Jupiter Sandbar Party.

They paddle both ways with current.

Launch is about 10 a.m. at JD Park’s River Area Swim Beach.

Organizers ask you arrive by 9:30 a.m.

Live music, food and music are planned.

Click here for to register or for more information.

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Gardens Mall event raises about $15,000 for Loggerhead Center

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(Left to right) Michael Brown, winner of this year’s Juno Beach Pier Photo Contest, Loggerhead mascot Fletch and Loggerhead President and CEO Jack Lighton at Aug. 19 event (Photos contributed)

More than $15,000 was raised Aug. 19 for the Loggerhead Marinelife Center at the The Gardens Mall event attended by about 4,000 people.

Events for children and families included hands-on science activities, including Junior Vet Labs and conservation demonstrations.

The Gardens Mall and its retailers hosted various Shop and Support events to raise money for LMC, located in Juno Beach.

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Adrian Farmer and stuffed sea turtle at The Garden Mall fundraiser

 

Jupiter struts its stuff to attract a new town manager

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“Pristine beaches, unmatched recreational offerings, stunning scenic vistas, a high quality of life,” reads the national advertisement seeking a new town manager in Jupiter.

About 50 candidates from across the country sent in their resumes, seeking the position that Andy Lukasik vacated.

Read the full story in The Palm Beach Post.

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Love Street in Jupiter: Sept. 7 is the final vote

Wearing red shirts, opponents have attended town council meetings and said the plan will bring too much traffic and pollution to Jupiter’s Inlet Village.

Finally — after three years of revisions, lawsuits and public hearings — the Love Street plan to build an outdoor marketplace on the Jupiter Inlet is scheduled for a final vote before the town council Thursday, Sept. 7.

See full story in The Palm Beach Post.

Love Street developer Charles Modica says the outdoor marketplace will bring recreation, jobs and tax revenue to Jupiter.

 

Wrists bands – and more stuff you didn’t know – about Juno Beach Pier

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The Juno Beach Pier is a great spot to fish, watch rocket launches, take photos, enjoy sunsets/sunrises, attend church services, get married, watch sea turtles and bring a brown-bag lunch. (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

Fishermen and sightseers to the Juno Beach Fishing Pier might be wondering:

What’s up with the wrist bands?

And the music?

It’s all part of making the pier experience more fun, says Jack Lighton, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Loggerhead Marinelife Center, which manages the Juno Beach Fishing Pier just south of Marcinski Road.

The recorded music is piped-in. Live music events on the pier have been held.

As for the wrist bands now handed out to pier visitors:

“Guests often leave the pier to use the restrooms or leave during a quick passing rain shower.  The guest entry bands allow for quick re-entry to the pier and eliminates the need for our guests to hold and manage paper receipts,” according to Lighton.

The wrist bands allow pier visitors to leave and return on the same day without paying

Here’s numbers on sea life rescues:

  • 42 sea turtles rescued from the pier (2013 – present)
  • 52 shore birds rescued from the pier (2015 – present) 

Read about LMC’s  $14 million expansion.

More Juno Beach Pier numbers:

  • 2016 Anglers: 36,206
  • 2016 Visitors: 73,269
  • 2016 Amount of fishing line recycled (in miles): 52.68 miles
  • 2016 Amount of glass and aluminum recycled: 19,465 individual items
  • 2016 Amount of cigarette butts collected and disposed of: 3,924
  • 2016 Amount of underwater debris removed via underwater pier cleanups: 199.06 lbs.
  • 2007 – present: amount of underwater debris removed via underwater pier cleanups: 2,637.91 lbs.

Jonathan Zmistowski, left, and Byron Thomas show the 60-pound wahoo they caught on the morning of June 28 while trolling a lure in 88 feet off the Juno Beach Pier.(File photo)

 

Daily, it’s $1 to walk on the pier. For fishermen, it’s $4.

The hours of operation of the Juno Beach Fishing Pier:

March 1st – October 31st: Monday – Sunday 30 minutes before sunrise – sunset

November 1st – February 28th: Sunday-Thursday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m. and Friday – Saturday 6 a.m. to midnight.

LMC, using grants and support the Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County and Keep America Beautiful:
– Added tables and seating to the pier deck
– Hosted several FREE fishing clinics
– Added additional recycling containers
– Added additional monofilament (fishing line) recycling containers
– Added cigarette butt recycling containers

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Cigarette butts make up a large portion of the trash collected on the north county beach. 

 

No more balloons at PBC parks starting Sept. 1 to protect sealife

Sea turtles often wind up mistaking plastic for food and choking on them.

Starting Sept. 1, balloons are illegal at Palm Beach County beachfront parks.

READ: Balloon releases banned in Palm Beach

“Sea turtles think they are jellyfish. Plastic in the ocean is a big issue. We want to protect native wild life and preserve the environment,” said Jennifer Cirillo, Palm Beach County assistant director of parks and recreation.

Signs have been posted at Loggerhead Park on A1A for about a year in preparation for the county ordinance to go in effect Sept. 1., said Cirillo.

“The public has had a positive response,” she said.

Loggerhead Marinelife Center officials welcome the balloon ban.

Medical staff at LMC often treat turtles injured from eating balloons and other plastic items.

When ingested, the remains can potentially damage sea turtles’ digestive systems, lead to starvation and even death.

“Ending the use of balloons at these beachfront parks will help protect sea turtles and other coastal wildlife, as well as provide clean, beautiful parks for locals and thousands of out-of-county guests who visit them every year,” said Tommy Cutt, LMC’s chief conservation officer.

The penalty is up to $500 and up to 60 days in jail faces a person who violates the balloon ban, according to county records.

Signs recently have been posted in 11 beachfront Palm Beach County parks between Boca Raton and Tequesta.

Leading up to Sept. 1, park officials will warn those visiting the parks who have balloons about the upcoming ordinance.

Sea turtles, dolphins, whales, fish and birds have been reported with balloons in their stomachs and ribbons and strings can lead to entanglement, injuries and even death, according to Florida Fish and Wildlife Service.

There are two types of balloons in general use – latex and mylar.

Mylar balloons are made with nylon. They are not considered biodegradable.

Although latex balloons are considered bio-degradable, this will take anywhere from 6 months to 4 years to decompose. Latex balloons can be especially deadly as their burst remnants actually mimic the food of many creatures, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

READ: Banning plastic shopping bags is gaining support

Coral Gables on May 9 was the first in Florida to approve a plastic bag ban. City commissioners approved the prohibiting the use of single-use, carryout plastic bags by retailers in the city and at special events.

Violators in Coral Gables face a $50 to $500 fine.

Several exceptions are allowed, such as plastic bags that hold prescriptions, those used at veterinarians’ offices, those for yard waste and several more.

These are the Palm Beach County beachfront parks where the balloon ban will be enforced starting Sept. 1:

 

Cloud cover doesn’t dampen spirits of Jupiter eclipse fans

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Cloud cover made Monday’s the eclipse tough to see at Juno Beach Pier, but dozens showed up (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

Sharing eclipse safety glasses, grilling chicken and generally just having a blast at the waterfront, several hundred lunar watchers gathered at DuBois Park on Monday afternoon for the rare celestial event.

Read full coverage in The Palm Beach Post.

“It’s so great to see so many people in the same place getting along. We need more of this right now in this country,” said Joey Huempfner, a Realtor from Jupiter.

Meanwhile, dozens of sky watchers started gathering about a half-hour before the 2:56 p.m. Monday maximum coverage by the moon of the sun. Scattered clouds blocked the view of the sun at the 1,000-foot Juno Beach Pier, but many stayed to watch.

“I like the fact we’re dealing with scientific certainty. With all the craziness in the world, science gives us something we can depend on,” said Dan Thayer, a former biologist with the South Florida Water Management District who lives in Jupiter.

Many watchers, such as Gabi Israelsen visting from Utah, made their own box cameras to view the eclipse.

“It’s not hard. It took me about 15 minutes,” said the University of Utah English major, showing how she cut away the cardboard top a Cocoa Pebbles cereal box and replaced it with tin foil. Poke a hole in the tin foil and it’s done.

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Joey Heumpfner looks at the eclipse Monday through his hand-made box camera. “The smaller the whole in the tin foil, the sharper the image,” the Jupiter resident said. (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

The parking lot at DuBois Park in Jupiter was full and had to be closed about 1:45 p.m., police said.

Watching as the sun reached its maximum 80 percent coverage, many marveled how it suddenly appeared dusk was approaching.

“It got cooler. The breeze came up. I was amazed watching through my glasses how much of the sun disappeared. The whole thing was so much more exciting than I thought,” said Teresa Ross from Tequesta.

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The parking lot was full at DuBois Park at about 1:45 p.m. (Photo/Bill DiPaolo)

Here’s a great location to watch the eclipse near Jupiter

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(Photo/Melanie Bell)

The Juno Beach Pier is located just south of Marcinski Road in Jupiter.

It costs $1 to walk on the pier, $4 to fish on the pier.

When you will see the eclipse in Palm Beach County.

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DuBois Park is great spot in Jupiter to watch eclipse

Admission to park on the south side of the Jupiter Inlet is free.

Read the latest on the eclipse in The Palm Beach Post.

Turtle lovers and shoppers meet at The Gardens Mall

Hundreds of sea turtle lovers and shoppers gathered Saturday at The Gardens Mall to learn about and contribute to the Loggerhead Marinelife Center to help sea turtles.

The free event was from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Grand Court of the mall.

Some merchants donated a portion of their sales on Saturday to LMC.

Marian is a sea turtle patient at Loggerhead Marinelife Center